A Parish Home

To Grow in Holiness

St. Peter Catholic Church

, 100 Argyle Steet, Regina, SK  S4R 4C3
, is part of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Regina. We are in the Coronation Park area, about three or four minutes’ drive west-southwest of Northgate Mall.

The Lord calls each of us: lowly or great, poor or rich, disabled or athletic, uneducated or educated. We love children coming, even if they make noise or distract sometimes. Our building is wheelchair accessible.  This website’s typefaces can be made bigger or smaller using the control to the right. Our site is not only for Catholics or Christians, so for times when religious terms are used, a link to a dictionary of Catholic and Bible terms is available at the bottom of each page.

Office: 306-545-4411,
stpete@sasktel.net

The office is open MWF 9:30-1:30, and TTh, 2:00-6:00. For COVID-19 safety, we want to ensure not too many come at once; please make an appointment and wear a mask.

Map of St. Peter Parish, Regina

For calls about confession, anointing, dying, or death please phone 306-807-0960 between 10:00 a.m. and 8:00 p.m. Hospital chaplains’ numbers, and prayers and reflections, can be found in our section, “Preparing for Eternity.”

For current information, please see our November bulletin and insert.

St. Peter’s Quilting Society for Charity are selling aprons (large, $14; medium, $12.00; children size, $10.00), place mats ($5.00 each or 4 for $15.00) and runners ($12.00 each). Click an image to enlarge. To place an order, email coffet@sasktel.net.

St. Peter’s Seniors’ Society and CWL membership dues payments for 2021 can be brought in or mailed to the parish office.

Our Knights of Columbus collected winter clothing for charity on Nov. 7. If you have some (clean and in good condition) to donate to those in need, it might not be too late. We invite you to phone 306-545-4076.

From the Canadian Coalition for Healthcare and Conscience:

  • [I]t is now legal for patients to request physician-assisted suicide in Canada…Please write to Saskatchewan legislators using the letter [at the website] to encourage them to create legislation that ensures that doctors, nurses and pharmacists have their conscience rights protected.
  • The Federal government has tabled new legislation for euthanasia in 2020. They plan to remove the “reasonably forseeable death” criteria. Disability activists are speaking out fiercely against this change because that criteria protects persons with disabilities from euthanasia. Click the link below to tell your MP that you want them to vote to protect the vulnerable.
    www.canadiansforconscience.ca/federal_government

For more current events, see the Regina Archdiocese Events Calendar.

Donations to our parish: At our parish we receive holiness through baptism, we are brought to repent of deadly sins and receive forgiveness, we are strengthened and delighted with spiritual food, we find the most beautiful ways to make great positive differences together in the world, and we are readied for eternal life. It is the Lord working through the Church, but it costs us significantly to do our part. Your financial contributions help make this possible. Donations can be made to us by cash or cheque (mailed or brought in), or by other means such as credit card, direct debit, or e-transfer.

Donations to our Archbishop’s Annual Appeal: Our community has many direct and indirect spiritual needs that our parish doesn’t provide. These include hospital ministry, the education of seminarians, functions of the Archdiocesan office, and more. All of us are asked to help financially. To donate to the Appeal, please click here.

Some Prayerful, Charitable, and Social Groups at St. Peter Parish

(See more groups, etc., in the Serving Together section.)

St. Peter's CWL

St. Peter's El Shaddai

St. Peter's Knights of Columbus

St. Peter Parish and its groups gladly and actively support a number of local charities and our nearby Catholic Schools.

😒  ☏  😃

During this difficult pandemic, If you need someone to talk to or pray with, or someone to pick up groceries, please e-mail outreach@archregina.sk.ca or call 306-541-3086, 9:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m., Tuesday-Saturday.

For other emergency aid: Food support, 306-777-7000. Food, shelter, etc., 1-866-221-5200. Mobile crisis, 306-757-0127. See the City of Regina’s Community Partners website for bagged lunches info and more. For workers and businesses, useful information is at the Saskatchewan.ca website. If you’re not sure who else to call, please phone or text 211, or start a web chat at sk.211.ca (service available 24/7).

If you like podcasts, we invite you to check out our Archdiocese’s Thinking Faith episodes.

Therefore, prepare your minds for action; discipline yourselves; set all your hope on the grace that Jesus Christ will bring you when He is revealed… Now that you have purified your souls by your obedience to the truth so that you have genuine mutual love, love one another deeply from the heart…

Finally, all of you, have unity of spirit, sympathy, love for one another, a tender heart, and a humble mind…

[R]ejoice insofar as you are sharing Christ’s sufferings, so that you may also be glad and shout for joy when His glory is revealed.

1 Peter 1:13,22, 3:8, 4:13

We wish everyone safety on the roads and sidewalks,
peace, and good health.

May God bless you.

Weekend Masses: Come to a Saturday evening or Sunday morning Mass only at the time given to you by our organizers. We temporarily aren’t advertising these times, in order to prevent walk-ins that would exceed the allowed number of people present. To request to attend, please email speteryqr@gmail.com, indicating which day and how many from your household, or leave this information in a voicemail at 306-545-4411. The request should be made early in the week, because the lists are usually finalized mid-week.

Weekday Masses: Tuesdays at 6:00 p.m., and Wednesdays to Fridays at 9:00 a.m. One does not need to send a request to attend on a weekday.

Christmas Eve Masses are planned for 4:30, 6:00, and 8:00 p.m. Christmas day Mass is to be at 10:00 a.m. Let us pray that there will be no health-safety lock down. Please register as described above, letting us know which time you prefer, and how many would come from your household. Some might not get the time they prefer, since only so many may come to each Mass. Our organizers will call when ready to confirm.

What is the Mass? And why is it great and necessary? Two introductory videos can be found here and here. The topic is further explored in “Why Catholic? Why Church?” and in resources in the “Always Learning” section of our website.

To ensure that COVID-19 is not spread here, those with possible symptoms, such as fever or chills, loss of taste or smell, new cough, or sickly feelings, and those who were in contact with someone with COVID-19 or outside the country within the last 14 days, may not enter our building. Then, social distancing between households, and wearing protective face masks are required.

Online Masses and other videos from our Archdiocese  are available at its YouTube channel. The following video is Archbishop Don’s Oct. 30 message. If you prefer a quick read, an abridged version follows.

In his letter to the Romans (5:1-5), St Paul speaks a word we need to hear, about endurance, about patience. He notes that “suffering produces endurance, and endurance produces character, and character produces hope, and hope does not disappoint us, because God’s love has been poured into our hearts through the Holy Spirit that has been given to us.”…

The pandemic is demanding an incredible patience from us, and it is exhausting us…So many of us are tired of restrictions, tired of masks, tired of not being able to do so many things in a normal way. Yet no matter how frustrated we get, Covid 19 continues to surge around the world, and here in Saskatchewan there has been a big spike in cases.

Caring for and protecting the most vulnerable among us requires patient endurance. Looking after our own mental, physical, and spiritual health and provide encouragement and support to others suffering from exhaustion and stress requires patient endurance.

Patience is especially difficult in an age of social media, and in an age of polarization. We see something we disagree with and we respond, we express our frustration…

As a people of faith, however, we are encouraged to ask “what is God’s way?” And while there are times when God acts with urgency and decisiveness, salvation history and even modern science suggest that God generally acts with incredible patience. If the universe is almost 14 billion years old, it is instructive that God waited almost 10 billion years before creating the earth, and another 4 ½ billion years before sending a Messiah.

When God becomes incarnate in Jesus, it was not the fastest way to communicate or show us the face of God… I am thinking of Star Trek’s ‘mind meld,’ which passes everything in one mind into the brain of another. God could have done it that way, but didn’t. Instead he showed us the slow and excruciating way of giving everything, unto death on the cross. After the resurrection, the Risen Jesus only met sporadically with His apostles and other disciples. The paschal mystery, the sending of the Holy Spirit, come in God’s time, as does clarity in the teaching of the church. God is incredibly patient. And of course each of us has the personal witness of God’s great patience with us, for often, mercy takes the shape of a patience that endures.

…So next time you find yourself fretting, full of anxiety, or frustrated or bursting with annoyance, remember and put your trust in the slow working of God, the patient and persevering way of God with us, and try to do it God’s way, relying on God’s patience, and showing that patience to others. Rich blessings along the way.

Pope Francis on the Parable of the 10 Bridesmaids:
Prudent Foresight is Needed

This Sunday’s Gospel passage (Mt 25:1-13) invites us to prolong the reflection on eternal life that we began on the occasion of the Feast of All Saints and the Commemoration of the Faithful Departed. Jesus recounts the parable of the ten virgins invited to a wedding feast, symbol of the Kingdom of heaven.

In Jesus’ time, it was customary for weddings to be celebrated at night; so the procession of guests took place with lit lamps. Some bridesmaids are foolish: they take their lamps but do not take oil with them; instead, the wise ones take the oil with them together with their lamps. The bridegroom is late, late in coming, and they all fall asleep. When a voice alerts them that the bridegroom is about to arrive, the foolish ones, at that moment, realize that they do not have oil for their lamps; they ask the wise ones for some, but they reply that they cannot give any oil because there would not be enough for them all. While the foolish virgins go to buy oil, the bridegroom arrives. The wise virgins enter the banquet hall with him, and the door is closed. The others arrive too late and are turned away.

It is clear that with this parable, Jesus wants to tell us that we must be prepared for His coming. Not only the final coming but also for the everyday encounters, great and small, with a view to that encounter, for which the lamp of faith is not enough; we also need the oil of charity and good works. As the apostle Paul says, the faith that truly unites us to Jesus is, “faith working through love” (Gal 5:6). It is what is represented by the behavior of the wise virgins.

Being wise and prudent means not waiting until the last moment to correspond to God’s grace, but to do so actively and immediately, starting right now. “I… yes, I will convert soon”… “Convert today! Change your life today!” “Yes, yes, tomorrow”. And the same thing is said tomorrow, and so it never arrives. Today! If we want to be ready for the final encounter with the Lord, we must cooperate with Him now and perform good deeds inspired by His love.

We know that it happens that, unfortunately, we forget the purpose of our life, that is, the definitive appointment with God, thus losing the sense of expectation and making the present absolute. When one makes the present absolute, he or she looks only to the present, losing the sense of expectation, which is so good, and so necessary, and also pulls us away from the contradictions of the moment. This attitude – when one loses the sense of expectation – precludes any view of the hereafter: people do everything as if they will never depart for the other life. And so people care only about possessing, of going about, establishing themselves… And more and more.

If we allow ourselves to be guided by what seems most attractive to us, of what we like, by the search for our interests, our life becomes sterile; we do not accumulate any reserve of oil for our lamp, and it will be extinguished before the Lord’s coming…If, on the other hand, we are vigilant and correspond to God’s grace by doing good, we can serenely await the bridegroom’s coming. The Lord will be able to come even while we are sleeping: this will not worry us, because we have the reserve of oil accumulated through our daily good works, accumulated with that expectation of the Lord, that He may come as soon as possible and that He may come to take us with Him.

Let us invoke the intercession of Mary Most Holy, that she may help us to live an active faith, as she did: it is the shining lamp with which we can pass through the night beyond death and reach the great feast of life.

We wish everyone safety on the roads and sidewalks,
peace, and good health.

May God bless you.

Therefore prepare your minds for action; discipline yourselves; set all your hope on the grace that Jesus Christ will bring you when He is revealed… Now that you have purified your souls by your obedience to the truth so that you have genuine mutual love, love one another deeply from the heart…

Finally, all of you, have unity of spirit, sympathy, love for one another, a tender heart, and a humble mind…

[R]ejoice insofar as you are sharing Christ’s sufferings, so that you may also be glad and shout for joy when His glory is revealed.

1 Peter 1:13,22, 3:8, 4:13

“Therefore, prepare your minds for action; discipline yourselves; set all your hope on the grace that Jesus Christ will bring you when He is revealed…

Now that you have purified your souls by your obedience to the truth…, love one another deeply from the heart.”

1 Peter 1:13,22

“Therefore, prepare your minds for action; discipline yourselves…

Set all your hope on the grace that Jesus Christ will bring…”
-1 Peter 1:13

A Parish Home

St. Peter Catholic Church

, 100 Argyle Steet, Regina, SK  S4R 4C3
is part of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Regina. We are in the Coronation Park area, about three or four minutes’ drive west-southwest of Northgate Mall.

The Lord calls each of us: lowly or great, poor or rich, disabled or athletic, uneducated or educated. We love children coming, even if they make noise or distract sometimes. Our building is wheelchair accessible.  This website’s typefaces can be made bigger or smaller using the control to the right. Our site is not only for Catholics or Christians, so for times when religious terms are used, a link to a dictionary of Catholic and Bible terms is available at the bottom of each page.

Office: 306-545-4411, stpete@sasktel.net

Office hours are now MWF 9:30-1:30 and TTh 2:00-6:00. To prevent crowding, please call ahead.

Mapt of St. Peter Catholic Church, Regina

For calls about confession, anointing, dying, or death, please phone 306-807-0960 between 10:00 a.m. and 8:00 p.m. For hospital chaplain numbers, please see our section, “Preparing for Eternity.”

St. Peter Parish and Archdiocese bulletins (also see the Regina Archdiocese Event Calendar):

St. Peter’s Quilting Society for Charity are selling aprons (large, $14; medium, $12.00; children size, $10.00), place mats ($5.00 each or 4 for $15.00) and runners ($12.00 each). Click an image to enlarge. To place an order, email coffet@sasktel.net.

St. Peter’s Seniors’ Society and CWL membership dues payments for 2021 can be brought in or mailed to the parish office.

Our Knights of Columbus collected  winter clothing for charity on Nov. 7. If you have some (clean and in good condition) to donate, it may not be too late; please phone 306-545-4076. Thank you for donations this year and in previous years!

Some Prayerful / Charitable / Social Groups at St. Peter Catholic Church

(See more in the Serving Together section.)

To Grow in Holiness

Weekend Masses: Come to a Saturday evening or Sunday morning Mass only at the time given to you by our organizers. We temporarily aren’t advertising these times, in order to prevent walk-ins that would exceed the allowed number of people present. To request to attend, please email speteryqr@gmail.com, indicating which day and how many from your household, or leave this information in a voicemail at 306-545-4411. The request should be made early in the week, because the lists are usually finalized mid-week.

Christmas Eve Masses are planned for 4:30, 6:00, and 8:00 p.m. Christmas day Mass is to be at 10:00 a.m. Let us pray that there will be no health-safety lock down. Please register as described above, letting us know which time you prefer, and how many would come from your household. Some might not get the time they prefer, since the number allowed at each Mass is limited. Our organizers will call when ready to confirm.

We are taking every precaution to ensure that COVID-19 is not spread here. Regrettably, those with possible symptoms, such as fever or chills, loss of taste or smell; new cough, sickly feeling or aches and pains; and those who were in contact with someone with COVID-19 or outside the country within the last 14 days, may not come at this time.

To protect you and everyone else who comes, ushers must check everyone for COVID-19 symptoms at the door. By prudent order of the Sask. Health Authority, social distancing and wearing protective masks are required.

Weekday Masses: Tuesdays at 6:00 p.m., and Wednesdays to Fridays at 9:00 a.m. One does not need to send a request to attend on a weekday.

What is the Mass? And why is it great and necessary? Two introductory videos can be found here and here. The topic is further explored in “Why Catholic? Why Church?” and in resources in the “Always Learning” section of our website.

Online Masses and other videos from our Archdiocese  are available at their YouTube channel.

Donations to St. Peter Parish: At our parish we become holy through baptism, we are brought to repent of deadly sins and receive forgiveness, we are strengthened and delighted with spiritual food, we find the most beautiful ways to make great positive differences together in the world, and we are readied for eternal life. It is the Lord working through the Church, but it costs us significantly to do our part. Your financial contributions help make this possible. Donations can be made to us by cash or cheque (mailed or brought in), or by other means such as credit card, direct debit, or e-transfer.

From the Canadian Coalition for Healthcare and Conscience:

  • [I]t is now legal for patients to request physician-assisted suicide in Canada…Please write to Saskatchewan legislators using the letter [at the website] to encourage them to create legislation that ensures that doctors, nurses and pharmacists have their conscience rights protected.
  • The Federal government has tabled new legislation for euthanasia in 2020. They plan to remove the “reasonably forseeable death” criteria. Disability activists are speaking out fiercely against this change because that criteria protects persons with disabilities from euthanasia. Click the link below to tell your MP that you want them to vote to protect the vulnerable.
    www.canadiansforconscience.ca/
    federal_government

In the Regina Area

The video above is Archbishop Don’s Oct. 30 message. If you prefer a quick read, an abridged version follows:

In his letter to the Romans (5:1-5), St Paul speaks a word we need to hear, about endurance, about patience. He notes that “suffering produces endurance, and endurance produces character, and character produces hope, and hope does not disappoint us, because God’s love has been poured into our hearts through the Holy Spirit that has been given to us.”…

The pandemic is demanding an incredible patience from us, and it is exhausting us…So many of us are tired of restrictions, tired of masks, tired of not being able to do so many things in a normal way. Yet no matter how frustrated we get, Covid 19 continues to surge around the world, and here in Saskatchewan there has been a big spike in cases.

Caring for and protecting the most vulnerable among us requires patient endurance. Looking after our own mental, physical, and spiritual health and provide encouragement and support to others suffering from exhaustion and stress requires patient endurance.

Patience is especially difficult in an age of social media, and in an age of polarization. We see something we disagree with and we respond, we express our frustration…

As a people of faith, however, we are encouraged to ask “what is God’s way?” And while there are times when God acts with urgency and decisiveness,…God generally acts with incredible patience.

…So next time you find yourself fretting, full of anxiety, or frustrated or bursting with annoyance, remember and put your trust in the slow working of God, the patient and persevering way of God with us, and try to do it God’s way, relying on God’s patience, and showing that patience to others. Rich blessings along the way.

Donations to our Archbishop’s Annual Appeal: Our community has many direct and indirect spiritual needs that our parish doesn’t provide. These include hospital ministry, the education of seminarians, functions of the Archdiocesan office, and more. All of us are asked to help financially.

😒  ☏  😃

We hope and pray that you and yours stay well, safe from COVID-19 and from its painful social and economic side-effects.

If you need someone to talk to or pray with, or someone to pick up groceries, please e-mail outreach@archregina.sk.ca or call 306-541-3086, 9:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m., Tuesday-Saturday.

For other emergency aid: Food support, 306-777-7000. Food, shelter, etc., 1-866-221-5200. Mobile crisis, 306-757-0127. See the City of Regina’s Community Partners website for bagged lunches info and more. For workers and businesses, useful information is at the Saskatchewan.ca website. If you’re not sure who else to call, please phone or text 211, or start a web chat at sk.211.ca (service available 24/7).

St. Peter Parish gladly and actively supports a number of local charities and our nearby Catholic Schools.

If you like podcasts, we invite you to check out our Archdiocese’s Thinking Faith episodes.

Informed by St. Peter’s Successors

Pope Francis on the Parable of the 10 Bridesmaids: Prudent Foresight is Needed for Eternal Life.

Excerpts follow:

This Sunday’s Gospel passage (Mt 25:1-13) invites us to prolong the reflection on eternal life that we began on the occasion of the Feast of All Saints and the Commemoration of the Faithful Departed. Jesus recounts the parable of the ten virgins invited to a wedding feast, symbol of the Kingdom of heaven.

In Jesus’ time, it was customary for weddings to be celebrated at night; so the procession of guests took place with lit lamps. Some bridesmaids are foolish: they take their lamps but do not take oil with them; instead, the wise ones take the oil with them together with their lamps. The bridegroom is late, late in coming, and they all fall asleep. When a voice alerts them that the bridegroom is about to arrive, the foolish ones, at that moment, realize that they do not have oil for their lamps; they ask the wise ones for some, but they reply that they cannot give any oil because there would not be enough for them all. While the foolish virgins go to buy oil, the bridegroom arrives. The wise virgins enter the banquet hall with him, and the door is closed. The others arrive too late and are turned away.

It is clear that with this parable, Jesus wants to tell us that we must be prepared for His coming. Not only the final coming but also for the everyday encounters, great and small, with a view to that encounter, for which the lamp of faith is not enough; we also need the oil of charity and good works. As the apostle Paul says, the faith that truly unites us to Jesus is, “faith working through love” (Gal 5:6). It is what is represented by the behavior of the wise virgins.

Being wise and prudent means not waiting until the last moment to correspond to God’s grace, but to do so actively and immediately, starting right now. “I… yes, I will convert soon”… “Convert today! Change your life today!” “Yes, yes, tomorrow”. And the same thing is said tomorrow, and so it never arrives. Today! If we want to be ready for the final encounter with the Lord, we must cooperate with Him now and perform good deeds inspired by His love.

We know that it happens that, unfortunately, we forget the purpose of our life, that is, the definitive appointment with God, thus losing the sense of expectation and making the present absolute. When one makes the present absolute, he or she looks only to the present, losing the sense of expectation, which is so good, and so necessary, and also pulls us away from the contradictions of the moment. This attitude – when one loses the sense of expectation – precludes any view of the hereafter: people do everything as if they will never depart for the other life. And so people care only about possessing, of going about, establishing themselves… And more and more.

If we allow ourselves to be guided by what seems most attractive to us, of what we like, by the search for our interests, our life becomes sterile; we do not accumulate any reserve of oil for our lamp, and it will be extinguished before the Lord’s coming…If, on the other hand, we are vigilant and correspond to God’s grace by doing good, we can serenely await the bridegroom’s coming. The Lord will be able to come even while we are sleeping: this will not worry us, because we have the reserve of oil accumulated through our daily good works, accumulated with that expectation of the Lord, that He may come as soon as possible and that He may come to take us with Him.

The text is taken from a subpage of Zenit.org.

Finally, all of you, have unity of spirit, sympathy, love for one another, a tender heart, and a humble mind…

[R]ejoice insofar as you are sharing Christ’s sufferings, so that you may also be glad and shout for joy when His glory is revealed.

1 Peter 3:8, 4:13

We wish everyone safety on the roads and sidewalks, and continued health.

May God bless you.