A Parish Home

To Grow in Holiness

St. Peter Catholic Church

, 100 Argyle Steet, Regina, SK  S4R 4C3
, is part of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Regina. We are in the Coronation Park area, about three or four minutes’ drive west-southwest of Northgate Mall.

The Lord calls each of us: lowly or great, poor or rich, disabled or athletic, uneducated or educated. We love children coming, even if they make noise or distract sometimes. Our building is wheelchair accessible.  This website’s typefaces can be made bigger or smaller using the control to the right. Our site is not only for Catholics or Christians, so for times when religious terms are used, a link to a dictionary of Catholic and Bible terms is available at the bottom of each page.

Office: 306-545-4411,
stpete@sasktel.net

The office is now open MWF 9:30-1:30, and TTh, 2:00-6:00. For COVID-19 safety, we want to ensure not too many come at once; please make an appointment.

Map of St. Peter Parish, Regina

For calls about confession, anointing, dying, or death please phone 306-807-0960 between 10:00 a.m. and 8:00 p.m. Hospital chaplains’ numbers, and prayers and reflections, can be found in our section, “Preparing for Eternity.”

For current information, please see our October bulletin and insert.

St. Peter’s Quilting Society for Charity are selling aprons (large, $14; medium, $12.00; children size, $10.00), place mats ($5.00 each or 4 for $15.00) and runners ($12.00 each). Click an image to enlarge. To place an order, email coffet@sasktel.net.

Drive-thru roast beef supper tickets, $20/person, are now available. Ticket holders can pick up their meals Nov. 13 or 14 between 5:00 and 6:00 p.m. Think of it: Mouth watering roast beef, potatoes, gravy, vegetables, 4 salads and cheesecake dessert! Call 306-530-3075 or 306-519-0313 to order or for more details.

For more current events, see the Regina Archdiocese Events Calendar.

Donations to our parish: At our parish we receive holiness through baptism, we are brought to repent of deadly sins and receive forgiveness, we are strengthened and delighted with spiritual food, we find the most beautiful ways to make great positive differences together in the world, and we are readied for eternal life. It is the Lord working through the Church, but it costs us significantly to do our part. Your financial contributions help make this possible. Donations can be made to us by cash or cheque (mailed or brought in), or by other means such as credit card, direct debit, or e-transfer.

Donations to our Archbishop’s Annual Appeal: Our community has many direct and indirect spiritual needs that our parish doesn’t provide. These include hospital ministry, the education of seminarians, functions of the Archdiocesan office, and more. All of us are asked to help financially. To donate to the Appeal, please click here.

Some Prayerful, Charitable, and Social Groups at St. Peter Parish

(See more groups, etc., in the Serving Together section.)

St. Peter's CWL

St. Peter's El Shaddai

St. Peter's Knights of Columbus

St. Peter Parish and its groups gladly and actively support a number of local charities and our nearby Catholic Schools.

😒  ☏  😃

During this difficult pandemic, If you need someone to talk to or pray with, or someone to pick up groceries, please e-mail outreach@archregina.sk.ca or call 306-541-3086, 9:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m., Tuesday-Saturday.

For other emergency aid: Food support, 306-777-7000. Food, shelter, etc., 1-866-221-5200. Mobile crisis, 306-757-0127. See the City of Regina’s Community Partners website for bagged lunches info and more. For workers and businesses, useful information is at the Saskatchewan.ca website. If you’re not sure who else to call, please phone or text 211, or start a web chat at sk.211.ca (service available 24/7).

If you like podcasts, we invite you to check out our Archdiocese’s Thinking Faith episodes.

Therefore, prepare your minds for action; discipline yourselves; set all your hope on the grace that Jesus Christ will bring you when He is revealed… Now that you have purified your souls by your obedience to the truth so that you have genuine mutual love, love one another deeply from the heart…

Finally, all of you, have unity of spirit, sympathy, love for one another, a tender heart, and a humble mind…

[R]ejoice insofar as you are sharing Christ’s sufferings, so that you may also be glad and shout for joy when His glory is revealed.

1 Peter 1:13,22, 3:8, 4:13

We wish everyone a very safe and joyful autumn,
and safe driving when roads get slippery.

May God bless you.

Weekend Masses: Come to a Saturday evening or Sunday morning Mass only at the time given to you by our organizers. We temporarily aren’t advertising these times, in order to prevent walk-ins that would exceed the allowed number of people present. To request to attend, please email speteryqr@gmail.com, indicating which day and how many from your household, or leave this information in a voicemail at 306-545-4411. The request should be made early in the week, because the lists are usually finalized mid-week.

Weekday Masses: Tuesdays at 6:00 p.m., and Wednesdays to Fridays at 9:00 a.m. One does not need to send a request to attend on a weekday.

What is the Mass? And why is it great and necessary? Two introductory videos can be found here and here. The topic is further explored in “Why Catholic? Why Church?” and in resources in the “Always Learning” section of our website.

To ensure that COVID-19 is not spread here, those with possible symptoms, such as fever or chills, loss of taste or smell, new cough, or sickly feelings, and those who were in contact with someone with COVID-19 or outside the country within the last 14 days, may not enter our building. Then, social distancing between households is required, and masks are highly recommended.

Online Masses and other videos from our Archdiocese  are available at its YouTube channel.


Archbishop Don discusses our obligation to vote informedly and conscientiously, and recommends including the information at catholicconscience.org/saskatchewan2020 in one’s preparation.

The Archdiocese also asks everyone to be informed and vote for Regina Catholic Board Trustees in the Nov. 9 civic election. For more information, please see the page at the Archdiocese website.

Pope Francis: Recent Messages on Fraternity and Social Progress

Excerpts from chapters 1 and 2 of his recent encyclical, On Fraternity and Social Friendship:

I offer this social Encyclical as a modest contribution to continued reflection, in the hope that in the face of present-day attempts to eliminate or ignore others, we may prove capable of responding with a new vision of fraternity and social friendship that will not remain at the level of words. Although I have written it from the Christian convictions that inspire and sustain me, I have sought to make this reflection an invitation to dialogue among all people of good will.

As I was writing this letter, the Covid-19 pandemic unexpectedly erupted, exposing our false securities. Aside from the different ways that various countries responded to the crisis, their inability to work together became quite evident. For all our hyper-connectivity, we witnessed a fragmentation that made it more difficult to resolve problems that affect us all. Anyone who thinks that the only lesson to be learned was the need to improve what we were already doing, or to refine existing systems and regulations, is denying reality…

For decades, it seemed that the world had learned a lesson from its many wars and disasters, and was slowly moving towards various forms of integration. For example, there was the dream of a united Europe, capable of acknowledging its shared roots and rejoicing in its rich diversity. We think of “the firm conviction of the founders of the European Union, who envisioned a future based on the capacity to work together in bridging divisions and in fostering peace and fellowship between all the peoples of this continent”.[7] There was also a growing desire for integration in Latin America, and several steps were taken in this direction. In some countries and regions, attempts at reconciliation and rapprochement proved fruitful, while others showed great promise.

Our own days, however, seem to be showing signs of a certain regression. Ancient conflicts thought long buried are breaking out anew, while instances of a myopic, extremist, resentful and aggressive nationalism are on the rise. In some countries, a concept of popular and national unity influenced by various ideologies is creating new forms of selfishness and a loss of the social sense under the guise of defending national interests…

Today, in many countries, hyperbole, extremism and polarization have become political tools. Employing a strategy of ridicule, suspicion and relentless criticism, in a variety of ways one denies the right of others to exist or to have an opinion…Political life no longer has to do with healthy debates about long-term plans to improve people’s lives and to advance the common good, but only with slick marketing techniques primarily aimed at discrediting others. In this craven exchange of charges and counter-charges, debate degenerates into a permanent state of disagreement and confrontation.

Amid the fray of conflicting interests, where victory consists in eliminating one’s opponents, how is it possible to raise our sights to recognize our neighbours or to help those who have fallen along the way?…

“…Isolation and withdrawal into one’s own interests are never the way to restore hope and bring about renewal. Rather, it is closeness; it is the culture of encounter. Isolation, no; closeness, yes. Culture clash, no; culture of encounter, yes.”[28]

Together, we can seek the truth in dialogue, in relaxed conversation or in passionate debate. To do so calls for perseverance; it entails moments of silence and suffering, yet it can patiently embrace the broader experience of individuals and peoples. The flood of information at our fingertips does not make for greater wisdom. Wisdom is not born of quick searches on the internet nor is it a mass of unverified data. That is not the way to mature in the encounter with truth. Conversations revolve only around the latest data; they become merely horizontal and cumulative. We fail to keep our attention focused, to penetrate to the heart of matters, and to recognize what is essential to give meaning to our lives. Freedom thus becomes an illusion that we are peddled, easily confused with the ability to navigate the internet. The process of building fraternity, be it local or universal, can only be undertaken by spirits that are free and open to authentic encounters…

In the attempt to search for a ray of light in the midst of what we are experiencing, and before proposing a few lines of action, I now wish to devote a chapter to a parable told by Jesus Christ two thousand years ago.Although this Letter is addressed to all people of good will, regardless of their religious convictions, the parable is one that any of us can relate to and find challenging.

Just then a lawyer stood up to test Jesus. “Teacher,” he said, ‘what must I do to inherit eternal life?’ He said to him, “What is written in the law? What do you read there?” He answered, “You shall love the Lord your God with all your heart, and with all your soul, and with all your strength, and with all your mind; and your neighbour as yourself.” And he said to him, “You have given the right answer; do this, and you will live.” But wanting to justify himself, he asked Jesus, “And who is my neighbour?”

Jesus replied, “A man was going down from Jerusalem to Jericho, and fell into the hands of robbers, who stripped him, beat him, and went away, leaving him half dead. Now by chance a priest was going down that road; and when he saw him, he passed by on the other side. So likewise a Levite, when he came to the place and saw him, passed by on the other side. But a Samaritan while traveling came near him; and when he saw him, he was moved with pity. He went to him and bandaged his wounds, having poured oil and wine on them. Then he put him on his own animal, brought him to an inn, and took care of him. The next day he took out two denarii, gave them to the innkeeper, and said, ‘Take care of him; and when I come back, I will repay you whatever more you spend.’ Which of these three, do you think, was a neighbour to the man who fell into the hands of the robbers?” He said, “The one who showed him mercy.” Jesus said to him, “Go and do likewise.”

Luke 10:25-37

Therefore prepare your minds for action; discipline yourselves; set all your hope on the grace that Jesus Christ will bring you when He is revealed… Now that you have purified your souls by your obedience to the truth so that you have genuine mutual love, love one another deeply from the heart…

Finally, all of you, have unity of spirit, sympathy, love for one another, a tender heart, and a humble mind…

[R]ejoice insofar as you are sharing Christ’s sufferings, so that you may also be glad and shout for joy when His glory is revealed.

1 Peter 1:13,22, 3:8, 4:13

“Therefore, prepare your minds for action; discipline yourselves; set all your hope on the grace that Jesus Christ will bring you when He is revealed…

Now that you have purified your souls by your obedience to the truth…, love one another deeply from the heart.”

1 Peter 1:13,22

“Therefore, prepare your minds for action; discipline yourselves…

Set all your hope on the grace that Jesus Christ will bring…”
-1 Peter 1:13

A Parish Home

St. Peter Catholic Church

, 100 Argyle Steet, Regina, SK  S4R 4C3
is part of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Regina. We are in the Coronation Park area, about three or four minutes’ drive west-southwest of Northgate Mall.

The Lord calls each of us: lowly or great, poor or rich, disabled or athletic, uneducated or educated. We love children coming, even if they make noise or distract sometimes. Our building is wheelchair accessible.  This website’s typefaces can be made bigger or smaller using the control to the right. Our site is not only for Catholics or Christians, so for times when religious terms are used, a link to a dictionary of Catholic and Bible terms is available at the bottom of each page.

Office: 306-545-4411, stpete@sasktel.net

Office hours are now MWF 9:30-1:30 and TTh 2:00-6:00. To prevent crowding, please call ahead.

Mapt of St. Peter Catholic Church, Regina

For calls about confession, anointing, dying, or death, please phone 306-807-0960 between 10:00 a.m. and 8:00 p.m. For hospital chaplain numbers, please see our section, “Preparing for Eternity.”

St. Peter Parish and Archdiocese bulletins (also see the Regina Archdiocese Event Calendar):

St. Peter’s Quilting Society for Charity are selling aprons (large, $14; medium, $12.00; children size, $10.00), place mats ($5.00 each or 4 for $15.00) and runners ($12.00 each). Click an image to enlarge. To place an order, email coffet@sasktel.net.

Drive-thru roast beef supper tickets, $20/person, are now available. Ticket holders can pick up their meals Nov. 13 or 14 between 5:00 and 6:00 p.m. Think of it: Mouth watering roast beef, potatoes, gravy, vegetables, 4 salads and cheesecake dessert! Call 306-530-3075 or 306-519-0313 to order or for more details.

To Grow in Holiness

Weekend Masses: Come to a Saturday evening or Sunday morning Mass only at the time given to you by our organizers. We temporarily aren’t advertising these times, in order to prevent walk-ins that would exceed the allowed number of people present. To request to attend, please email speteryqr@gmail.com, indicating which day and how many from your household, or leave this information in a voicemail at 306-545-4411. The request should be made early in the week, because the lists are usually finalized mid-week.

Weekday Masses: Tuesdays at 6:00 p.m., and Wednesdays to Fridays at 9:00 a.m. One does not need to send a request to attend on a weekday.

What is the Mass? And why is it great and necessary? Two introductory videos can be found here and here. The topic is further explored in “Why Catholic? Why Church?” and in resources in the “Always Learning” section of our website.

Online Masses and other videos from our Archdiocese  are available at their YouTube channel.

Donations to St. Peter Parish: At our parish we become holy through baptism, we are brought to repent of deadly sins and receive forgiveness, we are strengthened and delighted with spiritual food, we find the most beautiful ways to make great positive differences together in the world, and we are readied for eternal life. It is the Lord working through the Church, but it costs us significantly to do our part. Your financial contributions help make this possible. Donations can be made to us by cash or cheque (mailed or brought in), or by other means such as credit card, direct debit, or e-transfer.

Some Prayerful / Charitable / Social Groups at St. Peter Catholic Church

(See more in the Serving Together section.)

In the Regina Area

Archbishop Don discusses our obligation to vote informedly and conscientiously, and recommends including the information at catholicconscience.org/saskatchewan2020 in one’s preparation.

The Archdiocese also asks everyone to be informed and vote for Regina Catholic Board Trustees in the Nov. 9 civic election. For more information, please see the page at the Archdiocese website.

Donations to our Archbishop’s Annual Appeal: Our community has many direct and indirect spiritual needs that our parish doesn’t provide. These include hospital ministry, the education of seminarians, functions of the Archdiocesan office, and more. All of us are asked to help financially.

😒  ☏  😃

We hope and pray that you and yours stay well, safe from COVID-19 and from its painful social and economic side-effects.

We are taking every precaution to ensure that COVID-19 is not spread here. Regrettably, those with possible symptoms, such as fever or chills, loss of taste or smell; new cough, sickly feeling or aches and pains; and those who were in contact with someone with COVID-19 or outside the country within the last 14 days, may not come at this time.

If you need someone to talk to or pray with, or someone to pick up groceries, please e-mail outreach@archregina.sk.ca or call 306-541-3086, 9:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m., Tuesday-Saturday.

For other emergency aid: Food support, 306-777-7000. Food, shelter, etc., 1-866-221-5200. Mobile crisis, 306-757-0127. See the City of Regina’s Community Partners website for bagged lunches info and more. For workers and businesses, useful information is at the Saskatchewan.ca website. If you’re not sure who else to call, please phone or text 211, or start a web chat at sk.211.ca (service available 24/7).

St. Peter Parish gladly and actively supports a number of local charities and our nearby Catholic Schools.

If you like podcasts, we invite you to check out our Archdiocese’s Thinking Faith episodes.

Informed by St. Peter’s Successors

Pope Francis:
Recent Messages on Fraternity and Social Progress

Excerpts from chapters 1 and 2
of his recent encyclical,
On Fraternity and Social Friendship:

I offer this social Encyclical as a modest contribution to continued reflection, in the hope that in the face of present-day attempts to eliminate or ignore others, we may prove capable of responding with a new vision of fraternity and social friendship that will not remain at the level of words. Although I have written it from the Christian convictions that inspire and sustain me, I have sought to make this reflection an invitation to dialogue among all people of good will.

As I was writing this letter, the Covid-19 pandemic unexpectedly erupted, exposing our false securities. Aside from the different ways that various countries responded to the crisis, their inability to work together became quite evident. For all our hyper-connectivity, we witnessed a fragmentation that made it more difficult to resolve problems that affect us all. Anyone who thinks that the only lesson to be learned was the need to improve what we were already doing, or to refine existing systems and regulations, is denying reality…

For decades, it seemed that the world had learned a lesson from its many wars and disasters, and was slowly moving towards various forms of integration. For example, there was the dream of a united Europe, capable of acknowledging its shared roots and rejoicing in its rich diversity. We think of “the firm conviction of the founders of the European Union, who envisioned a future based on the capacity to work together in bridging divisions and in fostering peace and fellowship between all the peoples of this continent”.[7] There was also a growing desire for integration in Latin America, and several steps were taken in this direction. In some countries and regions, attempts at reconciliation and rapprochement proved fruitful, while others showed great promise.

Our own days, however, seem to be showing signs of a certain regression. Ancient conflicts thought long buried are breaking out anew, while instances of a myopic, extremist, resentful and aggressive nationalism are on the rise. In some countries, a concept of popular and national unity influenced by various ideologies is creating new forms of selfishness and a loss of the social sense under the guise of defending national interests…

Today, in many countries, hyperbole, extremism and polarization have become political tools. Employing a strategy of ridicule, suspicion and relentless criticism, in a variety of ways one denies the right of others to exist or to have an opinion…Political life no longer has to do with healthy debates about long-term plans to improve people’s lives and to advance the common good, but only with slick marketing techniques primarily aimed at discrediting others. In this craven exchange of charges and counter-charges, debate degenerates into a permanent state of disagreement and confrontation.

Amid the fray of conflicting interests, where victory consists in eliminating one’s opponents, how is it possible to raise our sights to recognize our neighbours or to help those who have fallen along the way?…

“…Isolation and withdrawal into one’s own interests are never the way to restore hope and bring about renewal. Rather, it is closeness; it is the culture of encounter. Isolation, no; closeness, yes. Culture clash, no; culture of encounter, yes.”[28]

Together, we can seek the truth in dialogue, in relaxed conversation or in passionate debate. To do so calls for perseverance; it entails moments of silence and suffering, yet it can patiently embrace the broader experience of individuals and peoples. The flood of information at our fingertips does not make for greater wisdom. Wisdom is not born of quick searches on the internet nor is it a mass of unverified data. That is not the way to mature in the encounter with truth. Conversations revolve only around the latest data; they become merely horizontal and cumulative. We fail to keep our attention focused, to penetrate to the heart of matters, and to recognize what is essential to give meaning to our lives. Freedom thus becomes an illusion that we are peddled, easily confused with the ability to navigate the internet. The process of building fraternity, be it local or universal, can only be undertaken by spirits that are free and open to authentic encounters…

In the attempt to search for a ray of light in the midst of what we are experiencing, and before proposing a few lines of action, I now wish to devote a chapter to a parable told by Jesus Christ two thousand years ago.Although this Letter is addressed to all people of good will, regardless of their religious convictions, the parable is one that any of us can relate to and find challenging.

Just then a lawyer stood up to test Jesus. “Teacher,” he said, “what must I do to inherit eternal life?” He said to him, “What is written in the law? What do you read there?” He answered, “You shall love the Lord your God with all your heart, and with all your soul, and with all your strength, and with all your mind; and your neighbour as yourself.” And he said to him, “You have given the right answer; do this, and you will live.” But wanting to justify himself, he asked Jesus, “And who is my neighbour?”

Jesus replied, “A man was going down from Jerusalem to Jericho, and fell into the hands of robbers, who stripped him, beat him, and went away, leaving him half dead. Now by chance a priest was going down that road; and when he saw him, he passed by on the other side. So likewise a Levite, when he came to the place and saw him, passed by on the other side. But a Samaritan while traveling came near him; and when he saw him, he was moved with pity. He went to him and bandaged his wounds, having poured oil and wine on them. Then he put him on his own animal, brought him to an inn, and took care of him. The next day he took out two denarii, gave them to the innkeeper, and said, ‘Take care of him; and when I come back, I will repay you whatever more you spend.’ Which of these three, do you think, was a neighbour to the man who fell into the hands of the robbers?” He said, “The one who showed him mercy.” Jesus said to him, “Go and do likewise.”

Luke 10:25-37

Finally, all of you, have unity of spirit, sympathy, love for one another, a tender heart, and a humble mind…

[R]ejoice insofar as you are sharing Christ’s sufferings, so that you may also be glad and shout for joy when His glory is revealed.

1 Peter 3:8, 4:13

We wish everyone a joyful autumn,
and safe driving when the roads get slippery.

May God bless you.